9 Reasons to Avoid When Hiring A Developer for A Product Team

Product team applicants have more strict requirements than component teams and classic project teams. Because of the higher level of responsibility and involvement, this is often the case. Specialists who are suited for this role require high proficiency and other skills. This will impact the quality and speed at which a product is released, as well the sustainability of the company and its ability to respond quickly to changes in the market.

Here are some common mistakes that could lead to the hiring of unsuitable candidates

1. Inexperience in cross-functional settings

A cross-functional product team has one unique feature: its members are involved with the decision-making process. This means they are used to communicating with one another and have many meetings. For a developer used to working independently, such communication might be a new experience. A developer who is used to working independently might feel distracted from the most important task of writing code. This type of developer is likely to be a problem. They will likely slow down work and demotivate other developers.

These teams use the iterative and incremental design (IID) which means that work is done in short, iterations. This allows for the implementation of high-priority business features in every version of the product. A typical iteration takes approximately two weeks. During this time, you must design, develop and test the entire product with the goal of getting as much user feedback as possible. It can be difficult for developers to adjust to such a fast pace. They may be less comfortable working with detailed requirements and might spend too much time designing the system.

2. Wrong work approach

It is important to know the habits and approaches of developers when writing code. These have a direct impact on the quality and timeliness of product releases. It is important to ensure that the specialist knows the differences between production-ready and feature-complete versions. Make sure the candidate is familiar with how the final product is released as well as how to manage the codebase’s ownership. Ensure that the candidate considers automated testing and code review part of their normal workflow.

Originally published on The Tech Trend

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The Tech Trend is a leading platform of news & information on the latest Tech, Business Growth, Startup, Digital Innovation, Reviews, Fintech, & many more.

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